About Us

Cornell

Our Mission

We are dedicated to the creation, dissemination, and implementation of scientific knowledge to improve the health and well-being of animals and people.

Our Vision

To lead, enable, and inspire others to attain a healthier world for animals and people.

Located in Ithaca, N.Y., Cornell University is a bold, innovative, inclusive and dynamic teaching and research university where staff, faculty, and students alike are challenged to make an enduring contribution to the betterment of humanity.  Cornell University is one of the largest and most diverse institutions in the Ivy League. We are a community of 22,000 students and more than 10,000 faculty and staff members representing more than 80 countries and hundreds of disciplines—global cultures, backgrounds, experiences, perspectives, and ideas.  The College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University is recognized internationally as a leader in public health, biomedical research, animal medicine, and veterinary medical education. Ranked consistently as one of the best veterinary colleges in the nation, the College's strength is due to its strategic breadth of focus areas and its depth of expertise in each of those areas; the achievements of its faculty, staff, alumni, and students; and its commitment to diversity and inclusiveness. 

Completed Clinical Studies

Observational, Infectious

Studying the Genetics of Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP)

The aim is to reach a better understanding of this virus in order to formulate a successful method of treatment and to work towards a future diagnostic test.

Oncology

Drug Repurposing to Aid Treatment of Canine Lymphoma

The purpose of this study is to determine if a repurposed antibiotic drug can improve the outcome for dogs with large cell lymphoma receiving concurrent prednisone compared to dogs receiving prednisone alone. Additionally, we will obtain data to identify

Observational

Investigating the Microbiome of Dogs with IMHA and ITP

This study intends to determine if there is a link between immune-mediated hemolytic anemia and the microbiome. Specifically, we are interested to find whether dogs with IMHA have similar microbiomes and if changes in the microbiome can predict recovery.

Oncology, Observational

Determining the Transcriptome of Canine Soft Tissue Sarcoma

Dr. Andrew Miller and his lab are collecting samples of canine soft tissue sarcomas to help develop new treatments and preventives for these tumors.

FAQS

Know before you register

What is a clinical trial?

What is informed consent?

What are my rights as a research participant?

What should I consider before agreeing to have my pet participate?

What questions should I ask before signing up for a clinical trial?

Will it cost me anything to take part in a research study?

How is my pet protected from injury in a study or a trial?

How are research subjects protected?

Do research participants get paid?

After the study is over can I continue to receive the study medication?

If I withdraw my pet from a randomized trial, will I be told if they received the placebo (an inactive, dummy pill) or the active drug?

What is a randomized trial?

What is a clinical trial?

Doctors and scientists take part in many kinds of research studies. Clinical research helps researchers understand how best to treat patients or helps them learn more about a particular condition or disease. There are many different forms of clinical research. One common form is a clinical trial. In a clinical trial, researchers test new drugs, medical devices or treatments.

Clinical trials may seek to discover new drugs, new ways of giving patients approved drugs, new combinations of approved drugs, new surgical techniques, devices, or biological products. Clinical trials are also conducted to test cutting-edge and novel therapies, like studies that involve gene therapy or gene transfer.

What is informed consent?

Informed consent is a process that helps you learn about the research study. After learning about the study, you will be able to ask the researcher or his/her staff questions. You should only agree to take part after you clearly understand the study and feel comfortable. You should take time to talk over your decision with your doctors, family, and friends. If you agree to take part, you will be asked to sign an "informed consent form."

What are my rights as a research participant?

  • You have the right to not take part in a research study.
  • You have the right to drop out at anytime.
  • You have the right to be given new information about the study.
  • You have the right to ask questions at any time and have them answered as soon as possible.
  • You also have the responsibility to stay informed during your participation in a study. You should ask questions about anything you do not understand or simply want to know.

What should I consider before agreeing to have my pet participate?

You may consider having your pet participate in a study because:

  • They may benefit from the best possible treatment or an experimental treatment that would otherwise not be available.
  • The veterinarians and technicians will closely monitor your pet’s progress throughout the trial.
  • You would be helping researchers to improve the treatments for future patients.

You might consider not taking part in a study because:

  • The experimental treatment may not work for your pet, or it could make your condition worse.
  • The experimental treatment may cause side effects that no one anticipated.
  • If the trial is randomized and includes a placebo (an inactive, dummy pill), your pet may not be given the experimental treatment.
  • The amount of testing for efficacy and safety purposes may involve too many trips to the research office and take too much time.

There is no guarantee that a clinical trial will help your pet’s condition, but the results will contribute to knowledge that may make a difference in the future care of patients.

What questions should I ask before signing up for a clinical trial?

  • If my pet is ill, will this research help them?
  • What are the risks?
  • What is involved? What will I have to do?
  • Will I be charged anything or compensated for my participation?
  • How can I end my participation if I change my mind?
  • What will happen when the study is over? Will I be told the results?
  • Is the study controversial?
  • Whom do I contact to express concerns or obtain information?

Will it cost me anything to take part in a research study?

Clinical trials test new drugs, devices, or treatments. In some cases, taking part will not cost you anything. In other studies, the research team may bill you for drugs, devices, and services they provide. The study informed consent form will describe any costs to you in detail. If the information in the consent form is not clear, you should ask the research team to explain any costs before you sign the consent form.

How is my pet protected from injury in a study or a trial?

Your pet is protected first and foremost by being told honestly and without bias what the known and potential risks are for participating in the trial. This information will be submitted to you in a language you will be able to understand. There is an Institutional Review Board (IRB) requirement that every participant in a clinical trial be informed about the possible risks, benefits and available alternatives. All of the information necessary to assist you in determining whether or not your pet should participate in a clinical trial is provided in a document called the "informed consent document." This document informs you of how to let the investigator know if you think your pet is experiencing a problem with the research and what resources are available to help you. You should ask any questions you may have about a clinical trial before signing the informed consent document. Even after you have signed the informed consent document to have your pet participate in a clinical trial, you should always speak to the investigator if you have questions or problems.

How are research subjects protected?

The Institutional Review Board (IRB) protects people and animals in research studies. The IRB includes scientists, non-scientists, and community members. The IRB reviews, approves, and monitors all in which pets take part. This oversight keeps risks to research participants as low as possible. The IRB also keeps track of ongoing studies to make sure they are being done in the right way.

Do research participants get paid?

This varies by study and will be covered in your Informed Consent Document.

After the study is over can I continue to receive the study medication?

Generally, participation ends when the study ends because it might not be safe or effective to continue treatment based on what is known at the time. Sometimes patients can remain on the study drug if they are responding to the new treatment; however, this is the exception rather than the rule.

If I withdraw my pet from a randomized trial, will I be told if they received the placebo (an inactive, dummy pill) or the active drug?

Most randomized trials will only disclose this kind of information when the study has been completely finalized; this is done to protect the integrity of the research data and results. If the trial is a "double-blind" trial, the doctor will not even know which substance your pet received. Most protocols will have information with respect to when a study will be "unblinded." If this is something that you want to know more about, ask the investigator what the study's policy is before you agree to participate.

What is a randomized trial?

Randomized is used to describe a research study that hopes to compare two or more different treatments or procedures. Randomized means that your pet will be assigned to a study group by chance, like flipping a coin.