Complement Inhibition in Canine IMHA

Investigational
ENROLLING

Overview

Has your dog been diagnosed with Immune-mediated Hemolytic Anemia? Help us find a cure.

Complete the registration form to find out if your pet qualifies to be in our clinical trial.

Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is a common disease that affects all breeds of dogs and can be fatal. In the severe form of the disease complement activation causes red blood cells to be broken down in the bloodstream. At present no therapies for IMHA target this complement activation. We have confirmed that an FDA licensed formulation of C1-INH is safe for dogs and effectively inhibits canine complement mediated hemolysis. We hope this will translate into a beneficial effect in dogs with intravascular red cell breakdown due to IMHA.

Compensation

Diagnostic Testing and follow up monitoring
Your dog will benefit from the provision of diagnostic testing and follow-up monitoring at zero cost to you. If the drug is effective and your dog was randomly assigned to receive it, then your dog may benefit directly from a novel and effective treatment for this disease, that may be life-saving. The infusion (both drug and placebo) will be provided free of charge.

Location

Cornell

ITHACA, NY

Location

Cornell University Hospital for Animals (CUHA)

930 Campus Rd,

Ithaca, NY 14853

Study Team

Carol Frederick
Carol FrederickClinical Trials Coordinator

Carol graduated from SUNY Delhi in 1994 and became an LVT. She spent 2 years in private practice, then moved to the emergency and critical care department at Cornell University Hospital for Animals. She obtained her technician specialty in ECC in 2007. After 21 years in ECC she moved to clinical trials, and now is the lead trials coordinator at Cornell.

Apply today if...

Your dog has been diagnosed with IMHA

Dogs who present to the Cornell University Hospital for Animals who are diagnosed with IMHA, do not have an associated underlying disease process, and weigh less than 28kg (61lbs) may be eligible.

Background

In Immune mediated hemolytic anemia or IMHA, the antibodies attaching to red blood cells lead to anemia that is often severe and life-endangering. In immune mediated thrombocytopenia or ITP, antibodies attach to platelets causing their loss which impairs normal clotting ability. Thus, patients with ITP often present for abnormal bleeding or bruising (e.g., bleeding from the nose, gums, or under the skin). Bleeding can be so severe that the patient becomes pale, weak, and anemic. Diagnosis of IMHA or ITP is accomplished using blood tests. It is important to survey general health as finding an underlying cause of IMHA or ITP helps guide appropriate treatment (e.g. possible initiating conditions include: infections, cancer, and drug or vaccine reactions).

Treatment may include blood transfusions, medications aimed at controlling adverse immune responses, and management of any underlying conditions. Prognosis for both conditions can be good depending on patient response to medications and underlying causal disorder.

About Immune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia

In Immune mediated hemolytic anemia or IMHA, the antibodies attaching to red blood cells lead to anemia that is often severe and life-endangering. In immune mediated thrombocytopenia or ITP, antibodies attach to platelets causing their loss which impairs normal clotting ability. Thus, patients with ITP often present for abnormal bleeding or bruising (e.g., bleeding from the nose, gums, or under the skin). Bleeding can be so severe that the patient becomes pale, weak, and anemic. Diagnosis of IMHA or ITP is accomplished using blood tests. It is important to survey general health as finding an underlying cause of IMHA or ITP helps guide appropriate treatment (e.g. possible initiating conditions include: infections, cancer, and drug or vaccine reactions).

Treatment may include blood transfusions, medications aimed at controlling adverse immune responses, and management of any underlying conditions. Prognosis for both conditions can be good depending on patient response to medications and underlying causal disorder.