Radiofrequency Therapy for Pain Management in Dogs

Investigational
ENROLLING

Overview

Help us find new ways to manage your pet's pain

Complete the registration form to find out if your pet qualifies to be in our clinical trial.

Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and pulse-dosed radiofrequency (PRF) are therapies used in people to treat chronic pain, including osteoarthritis (OA) pain. Neither has been researched in dogs for chronic pain management but could be highly effective, long-lasting means of relieving OA pain when other treatments fail.

Compensation

testing or procedures related to the study
There is no cost to you to participate in the study. Any tests or procedures unrelated to the study are the responsibility of the owner.

Owner Responsibilities

Visit the CUHA for a walk test
If you agree to let your dog participate in this study, you will be responsible to bring your dog to the CUHA for the procedure which will involve your dog being walked on a force-mat walkway to assess how he/she uses his/her limbs.

Owner Responsibilities

Consent for a RadioFrequency Procedure
Afterwards your dog with either be heavily sedated or anesthetized for the radiofrequency procedure and can go home the same day. We ask you then bring your dog back to be walked across the force-mat again at 2 and 6 weeks, and again at 3 months after the procedure. You will be asked to fill out a questionnaire at each visit.

Location

Cornell

ITHACA, NY

Location

Cornell University Hospital for Animals (CUHA)

930 Campus Rd,

Ithaca, NY 14853

Study Team

Carol Frederick
Carol FrederickClinical Trials Coordinator

Carol graduated from SUNY Delhi in 1994 and became an LVT. She spent 2 years in private practice, then moved to the emergency and critical care department at Cornell University Hospital for Animals. She obtained her technician specialty in ECC in 2007. After 21 years in ECC she moved to clinical trials, and now is the lead trials coordinator at Cornell.

Apply today if...

Your dog has knee pain
Dogs seen by the Cornell University Hospital for Animals (CUHA) with stifle (knee) pain that is difficult to control with other treatments.

Radiofrequency therapies in chronic osteoarthritis

Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and pulsed-dose radiofrequency (PRF) are therapies used in people to treat chronic pain, including osteoarthritis (OA) pain. Neither has been researched in dogs for chronic pain management but could be highly effective, long-lasting means of relieving OA pain when other treatments fail.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis in dogs, affecting approximately a quarter of the population. It is a chronic joint disease characterized by loss of joint cartilage, thickening of the joint capsule and new bone formation around the joint (osteophytosis) and ultimately leading to pain and limb dysfunction. The majority of OA in dogs occur secondarily to developmental orthopedic disease, such as cranial cruciate ligament disease, hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, OCD, or patella(knee cap) dislocation. In a small subset of dogs, OA occurs with no obvious primary causes and can be related to genetic and age. Other contributing factors to OA include bodyweight, obesity, gender, exercise, and diet.

About Pain Management

Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and pulsed-dose radiofrequency (PRF) are therapies used in people to treat chronic pain, including osteoarthritis (OA) pain. Neither has been researched in dogs for chronic pain management but could be highly effective, long-lasting means of relieving OA pain when other treatments fail.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis in dogs, affecting approximately a quarter of the population. It is a chronic joint disease characterized by loss of joint cartilage, thickening of the joint capsule and new bone formation around the joint (osteophytosis) and ultimately leading to pain and limb dysfunction. The majority of OA in dogs occur secondarily to developmental orthopedic disease, such as cranial cruciate ligament disease, hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, OCD, or patella(knee cap) dislocation. In a small subset of dogs, OA occurs with no obvious primary causes and can be related to genetic and age. Other contributing factors to OA include bodyweight, obesity, gender, exercise, and diet.